Archive for the ‘LGBT Rights’ Category

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Makes the March Worth It

In LGBT Rights on February 20, 2013 by edwinforyouthrights

Typed by Edwin Bonilla

In a few articles for this blog, I have submitted lyrics which deal with youth rights or LGBT rights. I typed those lyrics myself for a personal project I did, as part of my imaginary metal band. This song deals with the power of the LGBT rights movement and this song is from my lyrics album “University of Oppression” which I finished in March 2010. In the lines “Same-sex marriage will be a right when, equality for LGBT people in every county comes”, what I mean is that same-sex marriage will be universal when equality for LGBT people in every country comes.

“Makes the March Worth It”

The word family values has been twisted

To give bad ideologues the justification

To hate LGBT people but tolerance

Will come to sever the power of homophobia

Lies in the name of religion have been told

Politicians advance bills

Whose aim is to erode tolerance and who also

Refuse to go beyond the bad level of homophobia

A top of the years of intolerance and oppression

Is Equality for LGBT people

Which makes the march worth it

The march is worth it

There’s nothing wrong with sexual orientation and

Gender identity so equality for LGBT people is a must

Change is slow but bad ideologues feel the power of

People who refuse to surrender to indignity

Same-sex marriage will be a right when

Equality for LGBT people in every country comes

So march and fight for what must be done

And leave churches that support homophobia

A top of the years of intolerance and oppression

Is Equality for LGBT people

Which makes the march worth it

The march is worth it

Articles

Victory in Maryland and in Washington State

In LGBT Rights on January 22, 2013 by edwinforyouthrights Tagged:

Typed by Edwin Bonilla

I’m late to send an article about the marriage equality victories in Maryland and in Washington but this is too important for me to push aside. Public opinion about same-gender marriage doesn’t have to be 60 or more percent for there to be marriage equality. Civil rights and civil liberties should never put up to a referendum. This is a flaw in Maryland’s Constitution because it says that new laws can be put to a referendum. Of those two states, Maryland is my favorite so I am proud that same-gender marriages are recognized in another Central Eastern state or territory. Homophobes like to exaggerate about gender by saying that only a woman and a man can make for a committed relationship while all else is not. Fortunately, marriage is a right so all the excuses and nonsense that some people use against same-gender marriage can go fall by the wayside. In addition, families headed by LGBT parents add to the wellbeing of neighborhoods. Some conservatives who support same-gender marriage know more about this than me.

States and territories which recognize same-gender marriages before federal recognition are those states and territories that led with the LGBT rights movement. Because of legislators who are tolerant and courageous, Maryland’s General Assembly passed a bill that has made marriage equality possible. Those legislators made the votes of intolerant and cowardice legislators fall to defeat. If a legislator is tolerant but refuses to cast a vote for the advancement of LGBT rights, she or he mind as well cast a vote with legislators who oppose LGBT rights. In this movement, we have and will continue to encounter people who use religion to justify oppression or intolerance for LGBT people. If a person is trying to be nice in her or his opposition to LGBT rights, it is the message which should be taken and not the sincerity.

There’s still a long way to advance LGBT rights in the United States. Sexual orientation and gender identity don’t have federal law protection, except in the case of hate crime cases. If the Supreme Court does little to advance marriage equality this year, then only the LGBT rights movement can successfully push to advance those rights. Hopefully, the Supreme Court will treat DOMA as a relic of the 1990s. It’s great that there are many people around the country who support LGBT rights but it’s the people with an activist perspective who can do most to get same-sex marriages recognized. There’s necessarily wrong with being a mild supporter. Even in tolerant states like Delaware, New Jersey or Illinois, this is the case. The absence of equality doesn’t necessarily mean that LGBT people are being treated with intolerance but marriage equality and other rights are much better.

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The Civil Rights Act of 1964 should cover LGBT people

In LGBT Rights on December 27, 2012 by edwinforyouthrights

Typed by Edwin Bonilla

LGBT people should be covered by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Society is finally tolerant for there to be effective protection for LGBT people on a federal level. It is wrong for people to be barred from getting a hotel room or be discriminated on the job because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Although there is a lot of transphobia and homophobia, a federal law which would include protections for LGBT people would be a powerful advancement for the LGBT rights movement. If you are part of the LGBT rights movement and think that including LGBT people in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is too much, then you are throwing away a great strategy. That great law would punish and deter discrimination against LGBT in many places and situations. This would not be an insult to the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s-1960s because civil rights is a concept which evolves. From Puerto Rico to Colorado, to Alaska and to American Samoa, LGBT people would have a great deal of civil rights protection. Although same-sex marriage is a right and is a big part of the movement, let’s not forget about the importance of punishing and deterring discrimination.

When Democrats were in the majority in the House of Representatives from 2009-2010, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act did not pass Congress. That was a disappointment. Since this would be the case with similar anti-discrimination bills, then passing a bill which would link it to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a wise choice. Although every bill whose purpose to advance LGBT rights is a good bill, the reality is that few or none of those bills would pass Congress. The Republican party is a very conservative political party and this is reflected among members of Congress. In addition, every liberal and progressive Democratic member would have to give those bills priority in order to advance them. It would also not be a wise choice to pass a bill which would expand LGBT rights without the power of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Such a bill would be watered down by moderate Democrats and Republicans so that’s not what we need. The best strategy is to add sexual orientation and gender identity to the civil rights law. This would give LGBT people the same level of protection as on the base of race.

It’s good that there are some states that have good anti-discrimination laws for LGBT people, even in Nevada. However, too many states don’t have laws which address discrimination against LGBT people on any level. Those states need the federal government to cover anti-discrimination protection for LGBT people. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was a watershed moment for the civil rights movement and if LGBT people were covered by it, then it would also be one of two watershed moments for the LGBT rights movement. The other watershed moment will be when same-sex marriages are recognized in every state and territory. Since the concept of civil rights evolves, so should our federal civil rights laws.

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The School District’s Big Problem

In LGBT Rights on February 29, 2012 by edwinforyouthrights

Typed by Edwin Bonilla

Bullying because of a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity is probably the worst form of bullying. This form of bullying has caused many suicides around the country and one school district is noted for the tragic outcomes. The Anoka-Hennepin school district in Minnesota is where some LGBT students have committed suicide and where some students still struggle against bullying. Unfortunately, the school district does little to reduce the homophobic environment which can exist at the schools. The school district has a rule known as the “neutrality” policy in which teachers and administrators can’t express a tolerant opinion of LGBT rights. In that school district, teachers do nothing if a student says a homophobic comment against a LGBT student. In addition, teachers don’t talk about the importance of stopping homophobic bullying for fear of breaking the “neutrality” policy.

The reason why this oppressive rule exists is because of social conservatives, who believe in an ideology of oppression, have a homophobic attitude. This is the reason why the school board has not repealed the rule because of instead of doing the right thing, the members are too afraid to do so. Homophobic environments at the schools are allowed to spiral outwards and since we know that homophobia has no mercy or ethics, the results are sad to read. The “neutrality” policy must be repealed. If the rule is repealed, teachers and administrators can do much more to stop homophobia and can effectively punishment homophobic bullying. Letting students suffer because something board members can do but are too afraid to do is weak leadership. The school board members don’t deserve that position. Social conservatives are numerous in central Minnesota but let tolerance in and double down on intolerance.

It’s always to time for the Anoka-Hennepin school district to repeal the “neutrality” policy and do more stop bullying of LGBT students. What I mean by “it’s always time…” is that if one member says that she or he will start the repeal process in the autumn, then that’s too late and a lame excuse because the process can start today.

 

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DOMA, Go Down

In LGBT Rights on November 21, 2011 by edwinforyouthrights

Typed by Edwin Bonilla

For there to be a major advancement for equality in reasonable time, the Defense of Marriage Act must be repealed before 2020. I want President Obama to say before the 2012 election that he would sign a bill which would recognize same-sex marriage in all states and territories performed in those areas. It’s good that he said that he supports the Respect for Marriage Act and that his administration won’t defend a section of DOMA. Although I have a moderate view of Bill Clinton, he showed cowardice by signing that law in the 1990s. There are millions of homophobes in the United States and as the LGBT rights movement strengthens in other states, homophobia will be encountered. However, making sure LGBT people are treated fairly is important so intolerance must be conquered. Although “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” has been repealed, LGBT soldiers are still not treated fairly when it comes to military bases. The reason they are not treated right is because of DOMA.

To get DOMA repealed, the LGBT rights movement must not let Republicans in the House of Representatives, take down our momentum. If you have a representative who seems tolerant of equality for LGBT people, you should contact her or him in support of repealing DOMA. If you have a representative who is intolerant of LGBT rights, contact your Senators who can help. DOMA will be repealed when enough us make enough noise to bring it down, like the Berlin Wall. When the right amount of activism is generated, Democratic Congress members will have to listen to the LGBT rights movement. If President Obama refuses to endorse marriage equality, then he has taken LGBT rights activists for granted. He would appear intolerant to me. It has been four years since President Obama started campaigning in 2007 so I expect more from the President. I expect more from him and Democrats in Congress because time is not linear when it comes to civil rights. From 2009 to 2010 compared to 2011, there was a higher chance that the Respect for Marriage Act, a tolerant law, would have passed Congress. In 2011, the chances of this happening have decreased. Chances will seem narrow and they will certainly be encountered.

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Same-Sex Marriage is Part of Civil Rights

In LGBT Rights on July 12, 2011 by edwinforyouthrights Tagged:

Typed by Edwin Bonilla

LGBT Rights is part of Civil Rights. Same-sex marriage is a right because marriage is a right. There are many same-sex couples around the country who are in a committed relationship. If some of those couples want to get married this year, then they should so. The purpose of marriage is to advance a relationship and not necessarily for procreation. Same-sex marriage is not a “redefinition” of marriage. Homophobes use that word to show that they still hold onto gender stereotypes or plain dislike LGBT people. They haven’t learned that gender is not as a big deal as they say it is in relationships. Sexual orientation is not a choice. It’s true that Transgender people are the group most left out in the acronym, LGBT, but same-sex marriage can also be for Transgender people. Marriage can be more than advancement in a relationship because starting a family can be the next step. Parents of the same gender can make for great parents just like straight parents can. What makes for good parenting? Commitment to raising their children is the answer and to each other. Unfortunately, LGBT families are treated less than fair due to oppressive laws. Some of the parents always have to carry power-of-attorney documents, among other things when travelling. Families deserve to be treated with respect and not with suspicion. The United States should not stand for a country where LGBT families and LGBT people are treated as less than who they are. There are many countries where LGBT people are treated worse, but for tens of millions of people in the U.S., I included, we know better than that. We also know better than to deny marriage to some of the best relationships you might find.

There’s nothing family-friendly in being hateful against LGBT people because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Hate groups like Focus on the Family twist the words “family values” to justify homophobia. I think a big reason why homophobes are against same-sex marriage is because of gender stereotypes. This includes thinking that males and females be only friends if they are of the same gender. Another reason why homophobes don’t like marriage equality is because of religious reasons. However, a properly translated Bible doesn’t say anything bad about LGBT people. There are no credible reasons against the right of same-sex marriage. A person who says that a LGBT person has a “sin” because of her or his sexual orientation or gender identity has spewed nonsense. Despite the obvious truth that sexual orientation is not a “lifestyle”, there is a lot of homophobia in this country. Some homophobic organizations are rightfully classified as a hate-group. Even when not talking about same-sex marriage, homophobic organizations attack LGBT people for their sexual orientation or gender identity. Polls are showing the increase in support of marriage equality so when intolerance increases, homophobes kick and fight despite the fact that progress will continue. Although the 2010s feels like a conservative decade due to the number of Republicans in the House of Representatives and because the Tea Party, we shouldn’t be cowardice. Civil unions are a stepping stone to equality. For people who say that civil unions are enough, why is marriage accessible in the first place? The answer is that marriage is part of culture and that government gives married people many legal benefits. For LGBT families, this is important.

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